6.25.2011

Japan Tourism Campaign, Post-Fukushima, Daisan



Click comic to ENLARGE.

The Japan National Tourism Organization (JNTO) is doing its best to try to get tourists to come to Japan in the aftermath of the March 11 earthquake and tsunami in the northern Tohoku region, and subsequent nuclear reactor meltdowns in Fukushima, several hundred kilometers northeast of Tokyo.

The JNTO was never very good at convincing tourists to come to Japan in the first place (Japan's tourist numbers were slightly ahead of Singapore's last year), but they've launched a "Hope to see you again in Japan" campaign that will supposedly see outbound Japanese armed with postcards they can hand to likely looking foreigners.

And of course MTV has enlisted Lady Gaga to drink from a "Pray for Japan" teacup.

All of which got me thinking that a more aggressive approach may be needed. How dangerous is a holiday in Japan (one of the world's safest countries) really? Let's put our cards on the table, Japan!

Japan Tourism Campaign, Post-Fukushima, Daini



Click comic to ENLARGE.

The Japan National Tourism Organization (JNTO) is doing its best to try to get tourists to come to Japan in the aftermath of the March 11 earthquake and tsunami in the northern Tohoku region, and subsequent nuclear reactor meltdowns in Fukushima, several hundred kilometers northeast of Tokyo.

The JNTO was never very good at convincing tourists to come to Japan in the first place (Japan's tourist numbers were slightly ahead of Singapore's last year), but they've launched a "Hope to see you again in Japan" campaign that will supposedly see outbound Japanese armed with postcards they can hand to likely looking foreigners.

And of course MTV has enlisted Lady Gaga to drink from a "Pray for Japan" teacup.

All of which got me thinking that a more aggressive approach may be needed. How dangerous is a holiday in Japan (one of the world's safest countries) really? Let's put our cards on the table, Japan!

Japan Tourism Campaign, Post-Fukushima, Daiichi



Click comic to ENLARGE.

The Japan National Tourism Organization (JNTO) is doing its best to try to get tourists to come to Japan in the aftermath of the March 11 earthquake and tsunami in the northern Tohoku region, and subsequent nuclear reactor meltdowns in Fukushima, several hundred kilometers northeast of Tokyo.

The JNTO was never very good at convincing tourists to come to Japan in the first place (Japan's tourist numbers were slightly ahead of Singapore's last year), but they've launched a "Hope to see you again in Japan" campaign that will supposedly see outbound Japanese armed with postcards they can hand to likely looking foreigners.

And of course MTV has enlisted Lady Gaga to drink from a "Pray for Japan" teacup.

All of which got me thinking that a more aggressive approach may be needed. How dangerous is a holiday in Japan (one of the world's safest countries) really? Let's put our cards on the table, Japan!

6.23.2011

Yet another fenestration cartoon



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Snapped this house in my neighborhood last night.

Japanese are not in general keen on large windows ... yes, you can see out, but others can also see in, and of course there's the problem of double-glazing, which is a rarity, and resultant heat loss/gain. [If you install small windows, you can lose/gain heat through the uninsulated walls instead!]

In fairness, this is the side of the house, and presumably the owner expects another house to be built alongside – and very possibly owns and plans to develop the adjacent land – but still.

POSTSCRIPT: After posting this, I was reminded by my friend Martin of the "window tax" that was collected in England, Wales, Scotland and France at various points during the 18th and 19th centuries.

Beers for Books



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Made this comic a couple of years ago for fun after meeting Gary Bremermann, who does incredible work organizing Beers for Books events here in Japan.

If you don't know Beers for Books, the basic idea is that cool bars/restaurants agree to donate $1/¥100 for every drink sold on a specific night, with donations going to fund a high quality local language book for kids via Room to Read.

Since February 2009 B4B has funded more than 110,000 books for kids through beer drinking, and at the moment, Beers for Books events are organized in seven countries. Norm would be proud.

6.21.2011

John McCain, firefighter



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Senator John McCain and other Arizona Republicans are blaming illegal immigrants and drug smugglers for the state's forest fires.

Remember, only YOU can prevent forest fires ... by building a multi-billion-dollar border fence, and by arming yourself to the teeth and shooting at anyone with brown skin!

6.13.2011

Pro tip: Looking your best



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A personal one, and eternal cartoon fame for young Alexius.

6.07.2011

6.02.2011

Miyashita Park





Had a chance to speak about the importance of communication in urban planning (and anything) to @Remmid's students at Waseda University yesterday. To prepare, I spent an hour at Miyashita Park in Shibuya, shooting photos from which to make a couple of graphical stories that told the story from a couple of perspectives.

Brief background on Miyashita Park: it was an underutilized, dank and dingy urban park that was "home" to a number of homeless people, as well as an historical meeting point for demonstrators marching in Shibuya. The discovery (very late in the game) that Nike had offered (and that Shibuya Ward had accepted) to renovate the park, building a skateboard park and climbing wall, was met with howls of outrage by some who believed a public space had been "sold" to big business.

The ward's communication failings were critical to the issue; the park, unsurprisingly, is great-looking, and though skateboarders and urban climbers are a small interest group, so were the homeless who were displaced during construction (to the pavement just outside the park, from the look of it). But the ward failed to disclose Nike's offer early, and to communicate to residents (and other interested parties) their rationale for accepting Nike's proposal, as well, perhaps, as opening their doors and ears to other proposals.

The park was built, but the ward (and Nike, as an easy target) faced a noisy campaign of opposition, including messages such as "Miyashita Park is going to disappear" (patently untrue).
 
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Politicomix by Roberto De Vido is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License